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The Prevalence and Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury Among People Seeking Treatment for Substance Use Disorders (SUBI)

The Prevalence and Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury Among People Seeking Treatment for Substance Use Disorders (SUBI)

Principal Investigator: Carolyn Lemsky

Community Head Injury Resource Services of Toronto (CHIRS), CAMH and ONF have partnered to examine the relationship between TBI history in people seeking treatment for substance use disorders.

A growing body of evidence suggests that most TBIs in adults are in some way alcohol-related, resulting in high rates of Substance Use Disorders (SUD) for those seeking rehabilitation services.

Over 4000 adults at the time of intake to treatment (at a large, urban multi-service mental health and addictions research and teaching medical centre) during a 54-month period were included. The study was measured using a variety of tools such as the Ohio State University Brain Injury Identification Method (OSU TBI-ID), the clinical version of the Addiction Symptom Inventory-Lite (ASI-Lite), the Behavioural Symptom and Identification Scale-32 (BASIS-32) and the General Assessment of Functioning (GAF).

One in five (20.9%) of the full sample reported a TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC). History of TBI was associated with lifetime history of alcohol, amphetamine and cocaine, as well as serious problems with mood, hallucinations, suicidal thoughts, managing violent behaviour and difficulty concentrating or remembering.

Screening for TBI in general addictions programs will identify individuals most at risk for having a complex treatment course. In-depth screening is highly recommended for programs serving individuals with concurrent mental health and additions, and in populations with high rates of TBI (such as those in the military or experiencing

CORPORATE ANNOUNCEMENT – February 2021(Click to learn more)
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